Watercraft Teams

SUBC (pronounced Sub-Sea) is the UBC Submarine Design Team. Founded in 1989, SUBC designs, builds, and races a pedal-powered submarine in two biennial international submarine races: ISR in Maryland and eISR in the United Kingdom. This design cycle, SUBC is switching to a biomimetic, manta ray-based non-propellor submarine design. Members in all fields gain hands-on experience in composites fabrication, machine design, hydrodynamics, and much more!

 

UBC Sailbots design and build fully autonomous robotic sailboats.  After consecutively winning the International Robotic Sailing Regatta for the three years, they set their eyes on the Atlantic Ocean with their newest sailbot! They design power, control, motor, sensor and satellite communication systems built into a carbon fibre hull, along with routemaking and obstacle avoidance software algorithms, to ensure that their vessel can survive what the Atlantic Ocean has to offer. For more information about the team and how to join, see www.ubcsailbot.org.

sailbot

 

UBC Subbots is an engineering design team dedicated to the design and fabrication of a fully autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). We were founded in 2017 with the goal of competing at RoboSub, an international engineering design competition held in San Diego, California, where teams from around the world compete in a series of underwater tasks that mimic real world design problems related to underwater exploration, seafloor mapping, and sonar localization. Our project encompasses aspects of robotic and marine design which includes machine learning, computer vision, signal processing, power electronics, actuation, propulsion, hydrodynamics and stability. Visit us at https://subbots.ca/. Visit us at https://subbots.ca/.

 

UBC Voyage designs and builds unmanned autonomous research boats. The team is currently building a vessel that will be the first to cross the Atlantic Ocean autonomously in August 2019. The 5 meter ship will be driven by electricity from solar panels, making her energy self-sustainable. After the Transatlantic crossing, we will draw on our experience to optimize the vessel for autonomous marine research.